Points of Contact by Erfan Abdi

Erfan Abdi in the bird cage, performing Points of Contact at STEIM.
Erfan Abdi in the bird cage, performing Points of Contact at STEIM. © Erfan Abdi

Big eyes as contact microphones, a bird cage as a loudspeaker, and two double spring objects of which again one functions as a loudspeaker and the other as a loudspeaker: this is the inventive set-up Erfan Abdi uses for his performance Points of Contact (2017). Erfan himself seems to be a bird, placed in the cage to perform for us, gently trying to break out by touching the bars with his metal eyes.

The sounds during the performance are created by different combinations of the same set-up: both amplification as well as feedback through the contact microphones and tactile transducers are used. By using additional long springs the different elements can be connected to each other. To give an example of one of the many possibilities for doing all kinds of physical signal processing with this set-up: a signal of the big eyes contact microphones is sounding through the bird cage transducer, and since both are touching each other a feedback loop occurs (1 in the scheme below). The bird cage is also connected with a spring (2) to the double springs with a contact microphone (3). This is amplified through the transducer attached to two double springs (4). This is fed back again to the double springs with a contact microphone (5) by connecting the springs with the help of again an additional spring. The sound of all contact microphones is also amplified by the two main loudspeakers in the hall (the PA system) (6).

transducer exciter contact mike microphone Erfan Abdi
Set-up scheme for Points of Contact by Erfan Abdi, see the description above for a detailed explanation.

What makes this set-up so versatile for producing all kinds of different sounds, is that the two feedback loops can both be combined, influence each other but also broken up again (the first feedback loop are the contact microphone eyes and bird cage transducer, and the second the springs contact microphone and springs transducer). Take away, for example, the spring in between the two double springs—(5) in the scheme above—and the double springs become a spring reverb for the sound produced by the bird cage feedback. The whole set-up is constructed in search for fragility and inaccuracy in response to the feedback signal. For this reason, the two contact microphone springs have been chosen by Erfan because their frequency response is slightly different: this results in a modulating feedback sound instead of a feedback on one constant pitch.

The two contact microphone eyes
The two contact microphones are enlarged by small metal plates so they can touch several bars of the bird cage at once. © Erfan Abdi

For the same reason the contact microphones eyes are made by simple piezo disks placed on round metal plates: this gives the possibility to touch the bird cage at two or three bars. As Erfan explained me, when there is just one point of contact between the contact microphone eye and a bird cage bar the feedback tends to be especially strong on the fundamental frequency of the pitch. But as soon as you touch two or three of the bird cage bars, more partials are added to the sound. And by using two contact microphone eyes they also start to modulate each other. The placement of the contact microphone below the  two springs is again aiming for a richer and less stable sound: instead of having just a single point of contact, the whole disk is touching as much as possible of the surface of both springs.

The contact microphone beneath the springs. © Erfan Abdi
The contact microphone beneath the springs. © Erfan Abdi
The contact microphone beneath the springs. exciter body shaker
The tactile transducer underneath the two other springs. © Erfan Abdi
The tactile transducer bird cage exciter body shaker
The tactile transducer attached to the bird cage. © Erfan Abdi

Erfan uses the music software Reason to do some processing of the feedback. Basically it provides a compressor, a delay line and an amplitude follower. The amplitude follower is used for modulating the delay time, so as soon as one frequency gets too loud, the delay is changed, and the frequency of the feedback will also change. The connections between the different parts of the set-up—which contact microphone is connected to which transducer etcetera—is controlled live by Erfan with a small MIDI controller.

During the performance Erfan is sitting in the cage, an intriguing image for a music performance. The movements of his head towards the thin cage bars seem to underline the scenery of a bird locked in against his will. But it is with the resulting sounds that this bird seems to be able to leave the cage: the variety of sounds not only enlarge the musical possibilities of this set-up, but also give the impression that the music can sonically fly away from the cage. The bird might seem to be locked in visually but sonically it is free to come and go.

Below you can view some short fragments of Erfan Abdi performing Points of Contact at STEIM in Amsterdam, and listening to a recording of a performance excerpt. And if you are close to The Hague: Erfan performs a new version of this piece tomorrow (Thursday 10th of October) at Ephémère at Studio LOOS.

The Springboard by Eric Leonardson

Springboard contact microphone Eric Leonardson
The Springboard is made from everyday objects, such as a tin can lid, spring coils, pieces of wood and combs. © Eric Leonardson

Eric Leonardson invented his Springboard in 1994. This instrument is an excellent example of how the simple addition of a contact microphone can create a beautiful sonic phantasmagoria out of ordinary objects. When you look at the instrument, you can see all kind of familiar objects such as pieces of wood, combs, coil springs, a metal grill, a tin can lid and large rubber bands. The sounds produced by these ordinary objects are often of a surprisingly complex and varied nature. When listening to a recording, it is difficult to recognise the source of the sound and without any visual cues it often remains a mystery, which object produced which sound. This recording of a concert with the Springboard in 2012 gives an impression of a composition developed from the sonic possibilities of the instrument:

The contrast between sight and sound is mainly created by using a single contact microphone for amplifying all sounds produced by this instrument.  The main part of the instrument is a simple piece of wood. As the drawings by Eric show, there is a hole drilled in this board for a recessed mounting of the piezo disk. An older hole (see previous cable in the first drawing) is not in use anymore. As Eric explains: “I originally drilled into the end of the board so I could pass audio cable into the recess, similar to how a solid body electric guitar connects its coil to a jack. On the Springboard, the cable was soldered to a standard 1/4-inch jack and to the contacts of the piezo disc, inside the board. I abandoned that system because whenever I performed on the Springboard with more forceful percussive rhythmic pattern, the shaking would cause the audio plug to jiggle and momentarily break the connection, hence the audio output would be interrupted.”

Top view of the contact microphone mounted on the Springboard. Drawing by Eric Leonardson, © Eric Leonardson
Top view of the contact microphone mounted on the Springboard, the previous cable whole can still be seen. Drawing by Eric Leonardson. © Eric Leonardson

 

A cross section view of the mounting of the piezo disk on the Springboard. Drawing by Eric Leonardson. © Eric Leonardson
A cross section view of the mounting of the piezo disk on the Springboard. Drawing by Eric Leonardson. © Eric Leonardson

 

The contact microphone attached to the board. © Eric Leonardson
The contact microphone attached to the board. © Eric Leonardson

Since the contact microphone is amplifying the mechanical vibrations of the object itself, the amplified sound is filtered more than in other forms of amplification. Contact microphones give you a different sonic perspective of an object, without changing their visual characteristics. As Eric phrases: “Its ability to act as an aural microscope into unknown sonic yet entirely physical aspects of any object or material is truly exciting, if not amazing” (see The Springboard: The Joy of Piezo Disk Pickups for Amplified Coil Springs). He did not really plan to invent an instrument, but he was just looking for “a simple device for amplifying readily available objects and materials, producing a wide range of extraordinary sounds, in a way so tactile and immediate that the Springboard lent itself as easily playable” (see Eric Leonardson’s website on his Springboard, including information on all objects he uses and how to make a similar instrument yourself). But as it turned out, his search for sounds resulted in a musical instrument nonetheless.

The contact microphone seems to have initiated a process of exploring all possible sounds. The richness of the instrument is not depending of the objects themselves, or the simple method of amplification, but of a very intense investigation of all different sonic possibilities of the everyday objects used. What makes this instrument so special, is not the material itself, neither the form of amplification, but the playing techniques Eric developed: “I seldom ever hit any parts of the instrument as one hits a drum. Instead, bows, brushes, friction mallets, chopsticks, my bare hands and fingers apply controlled pressure, flexion, and friction to produce its most intriguing sounds. […] As with a stringed instrument, bowing produces a harmonically richer tone than plucking a string.”

Although nearly all sounds are produced solely by contact microphone amplification, there are a few exceptions. As you can see and hear in this documentation video of the Springboard by Joshua Baum, around 3’04” the small music box is amplified by placing it on the board and with the help of an effect pedal its sound is transposed. Musically, the use of the effect pedal seems to be an enlargement of the coloured amplification by the contact microphone: the transposition is a sonic development of the filtering caused by the amplification.

Another element is Eric’s use of the reversibility of microphone and loudspeaker technologies. In this case, he uses another piezo disk, but connects it to the output of a small radio. This piezo disk now functions as a kind of tactile transducer, and can transmits its vibrations to the objects it touches. By placing it upon one of the objects of the Springboard, this object starts to vibrate, and these vibrations are amplified by the contact microphone. This effect can be heard around 3’24” in the video above. Eric uses the tactile transducer as a kind of very special mallet or bow, being able to play his instrument in yet another way. In the next video Eric explains some of his playing techniques:

Eric is regularly performing with other musicians, and one of them is Birgit Ulher, who is using loudspeakers as a trumpet mute. In this video their performance as a duo starts at 40′:

Touche Nature by I-lly Cheng

We Spoke plays Touche Nature by I-lly Cheng
We Spoke plays Touche Nature by I-lly Cheng. © I-lly Cheng.

Vibrations of loudspeaker membranes cause air pressure waves, which our hearing system perceive as sound. As long as they are travelling through the air, these sound waves stay invisible to human beings. But as Ernst Chladni described in his book Entdeckungen über die Theorie des Klanges already in 1787, sound can be visualised by bowing a surface lightly covered with sand. So-called Chladni patterns are produced in this way. In her piece Touche Nature (2017) I-lly Cheng creates a phenomenon similar to Chladni patterns by placing transparent bowls filled with water on loudspeakers. The sound waves are visualised as water waves:

A bowl filled with water is placed upon a big loudspeaker in I-lly Cheng's piece Touche Nature
A bowl filled with water is placed upon a big loudspeaker in I-lly Cheng’s piece Touche Nature. © I-lly Cheng

A contact microphone is attached to the bowl and amplifies the bowl itself and the water movements in the bowl. Four percussionists each play a bowl filled with 1000 ml of water. During the performance the percussionists produce sounds by moving the water with their hands, rubbing the bowl, throwing stones in the bowl or pouring more water in the bowls. These sounds are all picked up by the contact microphones and then amplified  through the PA system. The water sound itself is also picked up by four condenser microphones and amplified directly through the loudspeakers in the hall.

The first page of the score of Touche Nature by I-lly Cheng.
The first page of the score of Touche Nature by I-lly Cheng (for the attentive reader: in the original version 500 ml water was used, but this was corrected to 1000 ml). © I-lly Cheng

As the first page of the score shows, the sound is processed with a pitch shift effect in the computer and there is also some feedback used. The feedback is created by sending the signal of the contact microphones back to the four loudspeakers underneath the bowls. There is no direct feedback happening though, but a pair of two loudspeakers and two microphones is together producing one big feedback loop.  The sound picked up by the contact microphone of player 1 is sent to the loudspeaker of player 3, which is then picked up by the contact microphone of player 3, creating a feedback loop by sending it to the loudspeaker of player 1. The same feedback is created between player 2 and 4.

An overview of the loudspeakers and contact microphones used in Touche Nature. The four condenser microphones used for direct amplification of the water sounds are not on the picture.
An overview of the loudspeakers and contact microphones used in Touche Nature. The four condenser microphones used for direct amplification of the water sounds are not on this picture. © I-lly Cheng

You can hear different kind of effects, including some feedback, at the very beginning of the piece, performed here by We Spoke:

During the piece I-lly explores the sonic world between natural water sounds and more abstract percussive rhythms. At the end of this fragment some pre-produced sounds are played through the loudspeakers, creating big movements in the water. These movements can not only be seen but the water sound caused by these movements is amplified through the condenser microphones. The loudspeakers seem to become liquid themselves:

Speaker Dress by Pauchi Sasaki

speaker dress Pauchi Sasaki
Pauchi Sasaki wears her Speaker Dress (2014), containing 96 loudspeakers. Photo by Juan Pablo Aragon. © Pauchi Sasaki

Our clothes can be seen as a form of communication between ourselves and the outside world. They give a visual impression of who we are and how we would like to be seen by others. Pauchi Sasaki designs dresses which are not only visible, but transmit sonic xterial as well. These dresses consists of around 100 loudspeakers, and are able to process sound live.

Pauchi got the idea for developing sonic costumes, when she performed in a temple in Lima. As she remembers: “But of course, it’s an ancient temple, so there was no electricity or outlets; I could perform only acoustic sounds, even though that’s not what I had planned. That’s when I got the idea of a self-contained system, but one that could be integrated into my body, that was the idea” (interview by Michael Barron).

The result was developed in 2014 and is simply called Speaker Dress. It is a self designed wearable sound sculpture. Two dresses exist nowadays, a black and a white one. The black one contains 96 loudspeakers, the white one even 125. Several loudspeakers are connected to the same amplifier channel. The black dress for example contains six channels of amplification, resulting in 16 loudspeakers per channel, and in six different sonic zones on the dress (a zone is formed by the loudspeakers diffusing the same sound).

Pauchi Sasaki Speaker Dress
Pauchi Sasaki in performance with her Speaker Dress. Photo by Janice Smith-Palliser. © Pauchi Sasaki

The performer can choose from different input possibilities: a contact microphone, a lavalier microphone and an mp3 player are connected. These signals are sent wireless to a computer, which processes the sound in the music software Max. The sound is sent back to the dress again and is diffused by the loudspeakers.

This is a short video made during a sound check for the Ojai Music Festival made by sound engineer Nick Tipp. Pauchi is testing the dress and walks through the auditorium:

All kind of live sounds made by the performers can be processed live during the concert and the transformed version is sounding through the dresses. Flutist Claire Chase and Pauchi herself, who is a violinist as well, use their breath, their voices and their instruments in the first composition Pauchi composed for  two dresses: Gama XV (2016). The performers are dressed in their own sounds, transformed by live electronics: