Doppelbelichtung by Carola Bauckholt

Carola Bauckholt has written several pieces in which the imitation of bird sounds plays an important role. Examples are Lichtung (2011) for string quartet and Zugvögel (2011/2012) for five wind instruments. In her piece Doppelbelichtung (2016) for the first time these “photographic imitations”—as Carola calls them—are confronted with real recordings of singing birds. This piece is for violin and 12 loudspeakers, among them several “violin loudspeakers”: by placing tactile transducers on violins and hanging them in the concert hall, sounds are transmitted through the corpuses of violins.

A tactile transducer violin ceiling
A tactile transducer attached to a violin, hanging from the ceiling. © Carola Bauckholt

Carola brought both worlds of violins and birds together in this composition and both have to be transformed to be able to approach each other. To imitate the bird songs, it is necessary that the violinist listens very carefully to the birds and searches for appropriate playing techniques to be able to imitate the birds as good as possible. But also the birds have to move closer to the violin:  their songs are slowed down, resulting in lower and slower songs. Both bird and violin sounds are notated very precisely in the score:

score Doppelbelichtung Carola Bauckholt
A fragment of the score of Doppelbelichtung by Carola Bauckholt. All bird names as well as the speed change of the recording are notated. © Carola Bauckholt

The twelve audio tracks of transformed bird recordings are played through twelve loudspeakers. Two of these loudspeakers are normal PA loudspeakers. Four of them are small loudspeakers placed in the audience, another small one is used as a monitor for the violinist. Most remarkable are the five “violin loudspeakers”, as mentioned above these violins have tactile transducers attached to them and the audio is sounding through the violin.

set-up violin loudspeakers Carola Bauckholt Doppelbelichtung
An overview of the set-up for Doppelbelichtung with the five violin loudspeakers (violin loudspeaker 5 is playing Specht sounds, which is a woodpecker). © Michael Acker, SWR Experimentalstudio
Violin loudspeakers Carola Bauckholt
The set-up in the concert hall, with the hanging violins, the PA loudspeakers on stage behind the violinist Karin Hellqvist and the small loudspeakers (the metallic objects next to Karin Hellqvist belong to another piece). © Carola Bauckholt

Double exposure—the english translation of the title Doppelbelichtung—is the technique of taking two pictures on one frame of film. In this piece every sound seems to be a sonic double exposure of a violin and a bird: the violin is imitating the bird sounds, which are in turn modified to resemble the violin. By transmitting these sounds through tactile transducers attached to violin corpuses hanging in the air every bird recording acquires spectral characteristics of a violin. The piece is a thoughtful conversation between these new creatures.

Doppelbelichtung has been performed by Karin Hellqvist and the SWR Experimental Studio:

 

Tonewood by Hugo Morales Murguía

Tonewood Hugo Morales
A tactile transducer as used in the Tonewood pieces: 2 cm cork on top, and some felt to not harm the instrument. © Hugo Morales Murguía

Tonewood I (2011) and Tonewood II (2015) by Hugo Morales Murguía are using small tactile transducers with corks attached to their cone. Five musicians play their instruments with these transducers. The transducers are not sounding at all, as long as they are not pressed to any surface. During Tonewood they are pressed against the wood of the soundboards of violins, guitars, violas, violoncellos, double basses or pianos. In this way, their soundboards become a kind of membrane for the transducers. As Hugo describes in the score:

The term “tonewood” generally refers to any wood which may be used in the construction of a musical instrument, specifically string instruments. An intrinsic characteristic of these instruments is the use of a resonant chamber, or sound-box, which not only projects the sound of the instrument but provides personality and quality to the overall sound of the instrument depending on its size, architecture and different kinds of wood used in its elaboration. This piece explores the internal resonances of each instrument and the way these correlate with the external performance space. For this, each instrument is continuously “scanned” through a series of impulses, exciting several resonant modes and projecting different overtones resulting in complex harmonic relationships.

Score Tonewood Hugo Morales
At the beginning of the piece the instruments slowly fade in. © Hugo Morales Murguía

Very minimal material is diffused through the transducers: just a pulse repeated each 80 ms and a sine wave of 659 Hz (pitch e). These are generated by a MAX patch. To scan their instruments the musicians follow a score in which three different aspects are notated. First of all, the volume of the sound diffused by the transducer (thus being the volume of the 80 ms clicks or the 659 Hz). They control this with a volume pedal. The second aspect is the amount of pressure the player uses to push the transducer against the instrument: low pressure, normal pressure and overpressure are the indications mentioned in the score. The last aspect is the placement of the transducer on the instrument, which is indicated by 4 (Tonewood I) or 9 (Tonewood II) numbers.

tonewood Hugo Morales
The nine different spots used for pressing the transducer against the instrument in Tonewood II. © Hugo Morales Murguía

This piece is not played on the strings of the instruments and neither fingers nor bow movements are producing the sounds. For this reason, the five musicians playing this piece turn their instruments around. This allows them to easier access the soundboard of their string instruments.

Ensemble Vortex rehearsal Tonewood Hugo Morales
Double bass player Jocelyn Rudasigwa during a rehearsal of Ensemble Vortex: she has turned her double bass around and is scanning her instrument with a transducer.
Tonewood Hugo Morales
Tonewood II starts with quick changes between normal pressure and overpressure,  a crescendo of the pulses controlled with the volume pedal and the transducer placed on the middle of the instrument. © Hugo Morales Murguía

This is a video documentation of Tonewood I performed by ensemble Modelo62 . Just having the same pulse repeated till nearly the very end of the piece opens your ears for a miniature world of sonic changes, all caused by the resonating bodies of the instruments themselves.

The system of Hugo reminds me a little bit of Ute Wassermann’s Windy Gong, for which she uses a loudspeaker with a cork placed on top. And indeed: Hugo confirmed me that he had been influenced by Wassermann’s loudspeaker after reading about it in Nicolas Collin‘s great book Handmade Electronic Music. This is—by the way—an indispensable book not only for those interested in hardware hacking in general, but also for several hands-on microphone and loudspeaker technologies. Chapters such as How to make a contact mike, The celebrated jumping speaker of bowers county, or Turn your tiny wall into a speaker are great sources of inspiration.

Tone wood II is going to be performed on the 30th of March in Geneva, so if you are close by, you can attend the concert by Ensemble Vortex during the Archipel Festival.